CHILD ETIQUETTE AND READING SKILLS AT KING!

MIND THE WAY YOU DISCUSS YOUR CHILD WITH OTHERS
           
Remember that what is casual conversation to you may be very important to your child.  It could be the difference between motivating your child or discouraging him.  The way you talk about your child with others—in your child’s earshot—can have a major effect on him.

- Follow these tips for discussing your child in front of others:

- Never think your child isn’t paying attention.  Kids instantly perk up their ears when they hear their names.  And your preteen child picks up more than your words.  He is mature enough to take note of the tone of your voice and the context of the conversation.

- Never make negative comments about your child to another person.  This includes talking to his other parent or relative.  Think of how you would feel if two people you love talked of how “lazy” you are, right in front of you.

- Do not discuss your child, in a positive or negative way, with his siblings.

- Think before you speak.  Save conversations about your child’s great grades or sports victories for when your child can’t hear.  Instead, talk about his kindness or sense of responsibility.  And if you really want to motivate him, praise his effort.  Tell about a time that he didn’t quit, even when the going got tough.

 
Source:  Sylvia Rimm, Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades and What You Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and Teachers, ISBN: 0-910707-87-1 (Great Potential Press, 10877-954-4200, www.giftedbooks.com).  Reprinted with permission from Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute
 

BOOST YOUR MIDDLE SCHOOLER'S READING SKILLS WITH A BOOK CLUB!  

Keep your middle schooler out of the “reading doldrums.”  Encourage her to join a book club!  Book clubs are excellent for boosting reading skills and can:

- Expand your child’s horizons.  A book club can expose her to titles and topics she otherwise might not choose.

- Teach her to appreciate books.  Maybe those stories she once called “boring” aren’t so bad, after all.

- Inspire her to write.  An engaging book discussion can be a perfect jumping-off point for your middle schooler’s won short story.

 - Introduce her to new people.  Who knows?  She may end up with a few bookish new friends.

- Sharpen communication skills.  As your child talks about books, she will become a stronger communicator.

 
Source:  “Lifelong Benefits of Joining a Book Club,” TheReadingClub.co.uk, thereadingclub.co.uk/lifelong-benefits-of-joining-a-book-club.html. Reprinted with permission from Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute